The community is gathering. We start exploring innovations in networked work and learning Jan. 25

Exploring Innovations in Networked Work and Learning is an open learning event designed to bridge two communities of practitioners: People in the learning professions and people who are enterprise social network champions.

Why?

When we look for new ideas that leverage enterprise social networking technology to truly transform the way we work and learn we see two separate streams of thinking:

  • Innovations addressing how we work or solve work-related problems coming from business and management practitioners – like working out loud, idea jams, crowdsourcing, and open design.
  • Innovations addressing how we learn coming from education or organizational learning practitioners – like MOOCs, connected courses, virtual communities of practice and communities of inquiry.

Our goal is to think about these two streams  as one. To explore the potential innovation that comes from criss-crossing domain boundaries.

So join us to fill what gaps you may have in understanding innovations emerging from the learning professions or from champions of enterprise social networking.

During a six-week period we will explore how both work and learning might be changed by understanding innovations in both. Four weeks will be devoted to understanding different innovations. Two weeks will be devoted to exploring how we might combine these different innovations in new ways to address our organizational challenges.

The community is already gathering.

We’re a few days away from the office start of activities and some 50 participants have joined the Google+ Community – a place for participants to introduce themselves, share interests and goals.

Helen Blunden and Maureen Crawford also kicked kicked things off by writing blog posts reflecting on their experiences in Exploring Personal Learning Networks – on open learning event we facilitated in 2013 – and their thoughts on where we may be going in the next few weeks. “More mental taffy pulling,” as Maureen calls it. Indeed.